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  • Sing Up Foundation launches new website and resources to support singing for mental health and wellbeing

    Supported by funding from Arts Council England, Sing Up Foundation has launched a new website at www.singupfoundation.org to support teachers, music leaders and all working with children and young people to use singing, songwriting and voice exploration to improve mental health and wellbeing. An ever-growing resource, the website provides advice, guidance, toolkits, video support, the latest research and more to support leaders and teachers in their work with children and young people. In addition to a wealth of new articles, research and support, the website features a host of newly commissioned resources from experts and partners including: A ‘Safe Spaces’ Guide  – Created by the charity Blue Cabin which supports care-experienced young people, this guide explores how to create experiences that ensure that participants and facilitators alike feel welcome, valued, understood and safe in singing and music-making sessions. (https://www.singupfoundation.org/safe-spaces) Beatboxing, Identity & Mental Health film series – Created by international non-binary beatboxer, disability and mental health ambassador SK Shlomo and their Breathe Academy, these inspiring films explore beatboxing and vocal exploration to support identity and mental health. (https://www.singupfoundation.org/beatboxing-identity-mental-health) Working in Challenging Settings Case Study – Featuring the work of Yorkshire Youth and Music at Becton Centre for Children and Young People, this inspiring case study provides a look at work with vulnerable young people in care, youth justice and health services using music to help them explore, create and express themselves. (https://www.singupfoundation.org/working-in-challenging-settings) Creative Vocals and ‘agency’ Research Review  – This research review conducted by Dr Douglas Lonie from research consultancy tialt looks at the evidence supporting singing, songwriting and vocal exploration and the connection to young people’s sense of ‘agency’. (https://www.singupfoundation.org/creative-vocals-evidence) A Guide to Singing for Mental Health and Wellbeing - Created by Emily Foulkes Trauma and Mental Health Trainer and Director of Music for Good, this guide highlights all the different types of singing activity that can be enjoyed with young people and advice for practice. (https://www.singupfoundation.org/types-of-singing-activity-for-mental-health/) Over the next few months, the Sing Up Foundation website will continue to grow and develop, adding more helpful resources to support anyone working with children and young people to improve their mental health and wellbeing. The website also hosts the entire first season of Sing Up Foundation’s podcast Inspiring Voices, which explores the power of singing to transform children and young people's lives. Baz Chapman, Joint Head of Sing Up Foundation says, “This launch of the new Sing Up Foundation website, supported with funding by Arts Council England, has allowed us to build a comprehensive platform to inspire, inform and connect anyone wanting to realise the benefits of singing and vocal exploration for children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. By continually developing content to suit our audiences, and by interacting with them, we hope to deepen the connection between the use of the voice and mental health and to increase our collective understanding. We hope that teachers, music practitioners, mental health professionals and anyone else with an interest in this work will not only find or our resources and support valuable, but will also join the conversation and help us shape the future of this valuable work.” Notes to Editors: The Sing Up Foundation (www.singupfoundation.org) produces, promotes and creates opportunities for children and young people to improve their mental health and wellbeing through singing. Through partnerships, resource development and innovation the Sing Up Foundation – explores and highlights effective practice, connects practice with research, creates research-based pilot projects to build and share knowledge and understanding and increase impact, and supports and develops the workforce and settings surrounding children and young people. The Sing Up Foundation is Sing Up’s charitable arm focused on producing charitable activities through fundraising, partnerships and innovation. The Foundation shares in Sing Up’s goal to ensure that children and young people have opportunities to sing and make music regularly and well for all the benefits that research shows that brings, with a particular focus on mental health and wellbeing. Foundation staff work for Sing Up and the Joint Heads of Foundation sit on Sing Up’s Senior Management Team. Likewise, two members of Sing Up’s staff, including CEO Michelle James, sit on the Foundation’s Board of Trustees. Sing Up (www.singup.org) is an award-winning organisation that provides resources, training and guidance to support singing and music in schools. Sing Up believes that all children and young people have a right to good quality singing provision, to deepen their understanding of music and singing, raise attainment and develop lasting tools to express themselves with confidence and creativity. With over 15 years of experience at the forefront of music education, Sing Up’s specially arranged songs, teaching tools and support put singing and music at the heart of learning. Sing Up Foundation’s podcast Inspiring Voices features in Feedspot’s recommended Top 10 Music Education podcasts. Through conversations with singers, leaders, researchers and other specialists, Inspiring Voices considers the unique role of singing, songwriting, voice exploration and creative music-making in improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing.

  • Join us: We're looking for Trustees to join our Board

    The Sing Up Foundation is looking for individuals who are passionate about singing and music-making and improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing to join our Board of Trustees for our charity. Following a period of growth and development supported by Arts Council funding, this is a unique opportunity to help shape our charity and support our work. Trustees will have an interest and experience with children and young people and a passion for improving their lives. We have identified the following areas of expertise that we’re particularly interested in adding to our Board of Trustees: Fundraising and/or finance experience Local or regional experience within the mental health sector specifically with young people and adolescents Lived experience and/or expertise in Mental Health Services Parents of children and young people that have experience and knowledge of the mental health challenges faced by young people Young people The Foundation welcomes applications regardless of sex, gender, race, age, sexuality, belief or disability. We’re also happy to have an informal conversation regarding the Foundation, the Board of Trustees and our work. We also recognise that not everyone will have had the same opportunities to progress to a governance level in their careers and we welcome applications from those who may not have previous experience serving on a Board. This is not in any way a barrier to a successful application. This is a volunteer role and does not include remuneration but reasonable travel expenses are covered. Please download the full role specification below: If you’d like to apply, please send in your CV with a covering letter by 30 April, 5pm to info@singupfoundation.org with ‘Sing Up Foundation Board’ in the subject line. When submitting your application, we process your personal data in accordance with our Recruitment Privacy Notice. Please note: This role is part of the Sing Up Foundation Board of Trustees. The Sing Up Group has its own Board of Directors and if you are interested in the joining the Sing Up Group as a Non-Executive Director, that role is advertised on the Sing Up website. The Sing Up Foundation believes in harnessing the power of singing to improve people's mental health and wellbeing. With 50% of mental health problems established by the age of 14 and 75% by the age of 24, we believe it's critical to focus on prevention by working with young people. The benefits of singing, especially in groups, are wide-ranging with extensive research supporting the physiological, social, psychological and behavioural benefits. The Sing Up Foundation aims to produce, promote and create opportunities for children and young people to improve their mental health and wellbeing through singing.

  • Sing Up Research Tender

    Sing Up is seeking an organisation or individual/s to carry out environmental research to help us better understand how the world has changed for children and young people and for the education sector since 2019. For more information, visit: https://www.singup.org/work-with-us/tenders Application deadline: 5pm, 15 March 2024

  • Share your views - Podcast Listener Survey

    Help us shape the future of our podcast and add your thoughts to our Inspiring Voices Podcast Listener Survey. We want your voice to be heard and we need your valuable input to make our podcast even better! Please take a few minutes to complete our listener survey and let us know what you love and what you'd like to hear more of. We'd love your feedback! Please complete the survey on Survey Monkey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/T5STYM7

  • Inspiring Voices Music Education Podcast: New episodes out now

    This brand new music education podcast explores the benefits of singing on mental health and wellbeing, with new episodes out every fortnight. Inspiring Voices is a new music education podcast from the Sing Up Foundation where we consider the unique role of singing, songwriting, voice exploration and creative music-making in improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. Join Joint Head of Foundation Baz Chapman and his guests - singers, leaders, researchers and other specialists - in inspiring conversations about their own work and experiences, sharing advice, support and inspiration. Our research conversations will also explore the benefits of singing. ​ A great listen for teachers, school leaders, teaching students, community workers, music leaders, singing leaders, choir leaders, charity and mental health workers. Follow, subscribe and leave us a review. Inspiring Voices is available on: Spotify: https://bit.ly/IVPodSpotify Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/45ZCVTx Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3raZXrF Audible: https://adbl.co/3MrTjVF Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/IVPodGoogle Each episode can also be viewed on YouTube: https://bit.ly/IVPodPlaylist Leave us a comment or get in touch to let us know any topics that you'd like us to cover or who you would like us to interview in future episodes of our podcast. The first season, funded through support received by Sing Up and the Sing Up Foundation from Round 3 of Arts Council England’s Cultural Recovery Fund, features interviews with: Sophie Garner - Sophie Garner is a singer described by the Times as 'one of the most stylish British vocalists', as well as being a music specialist, educator, speaker, and author of two books: The Creative Songwriting Journal and If You Can't Say It, Sing It! Sophie seeks to change lives through singing and songwriting. Aga Serugo-Lugo - Aga Serugo-Lugo is a vocalist, clarinettist, composer and workshop leader whose interests lie particularly in narrative-based community music-making, focussing on accessibility and inclusivity. He has worked with, amongst many others, Music in Detention, Trinity Laban, MENCAP, Wigmore Hall, Sing Up and numerous opera companies around the UK. He also co-runs Camberwell Community Choir and is Ambassador for Britten Pears Arts' 'Group A' in Lowestoft and Ipswich. Chris Morris - Chris Morris is a community musician working in and around Sheffield. He has helped to set up recording studios for community use, organises music events and Festivals and is a guide and mentor to many young musicians in the city. He is lead practitioner with Yorkshire Youth & Music working with young people in Youth Justice Settings and secure children’s homes, whom they describe as one of their exceptional music leaders, working as he does with some of the nation’s most vulnerable young people, so that they can discover, explore and develop their musical and creative potential. Jane Wheeler - Jane Wheeler is a freelance music education consultant and Director of Living Song, who works with a passion for raising the quality of music-making, developing young leaders and fostering community cohesion. Her many roles have included Music Advisor for the London Borough of Newham, Director of the music programme for ARK Schools, and Director of several choirs including Solid Harmony Youth Community Choir, Forest Voices adult community choir and New Young Voice Collective. Since 2014, Jane has been a leader for British Council’s World Voice programme. Mark Bick - Mark is a renowned and highly experienced community musician and trainer. Most of his working life based in Gloucestershire, particularly starting up what has now become The Music Works. He also worked in the West Midlands developing and leading training courses, including the Quench Arts New Horizons course, which has been running for nearly 20 years. The core of Mark’s work has been with young people who struggle with various barriers, including those excluded from school, who are looked after, or have disabilities. Mark is Vice Chair of Sound Sense, the UK professional association for community musicians. Professor Graham Welch - Professor Graham Welch is Chair of Music Education at University College London, Chair of the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research and is heavily involved in the International Society for Music Education. He is a former member of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council Review College for Music and has published numerous research papers into music and particularly singing, not least ‘Researching the Impact of the National Singing Programme ‘Sing Up' in England’ in 2011. SK Shlomo - SK Shlomo is an international non-binary beatbox star, former world looping champion, 3-times TEDx speaker and disability & mental health ambassador. They are also founder of the Beatbox Academy and long-time friend of Sing Up, being as they are, particularly gifted at, and committed to, working with children and young people. Ben Turner – Ben Turner is a Creative Manager, Community Leader, Award-winning Educator and Youth Arts Leader with experience in education, youth activism and creative arts/entertainment. Founding Director of Rap Club Productions C.I.C (home of The Spit Game, SpokenLDN, KingdomLDN), working against serious youth violence and promoting positive youth communities and cultures. He supports schools to embrace young Black cultures and creativity within the curriculum. He is a regular conference speaker and endorsed by the Home Office, TeachFirst, BBC and others for approach to youth work/education. David Lawrence - David Lawrence is one of the UK’s most versatile conductors, who works with symphony orchestras and bands, and with choirs and choruses of all types. But David may be best known as Principal Conductor of the Young Voices arena concerts with thousands of school children.

  • Coming in September: Inspiring Voices Podcast

    Our new Inspiring Voices podcast is coming this September. You can subscribe now to get the episodes as they are released. Join us as we explore the power of singing to transform children and young people’s lives. Through conversations with singers, leaders, researchers and other specialists, we’ll consider the unique role of singing, songwriting, voice exploration and creative music-making in improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. The Sing Up Foundation believes in the power of singing to improve health and wellbeing – so listen in and be inspired! Subscribe now on your favourite podcast platform - Spotify: https://bit.ly/IVPodSpotify Apple: https://apple.co/45ZCVTx Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3raZXrF Google: https://bit.ly/IVPodGoogle Supported using public funding by Arts Council England as part of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

  • PRESS RELEASE: Sing Up Foundation launches Inspiring Voices, a new podcast

    PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 20 September 2023 Sing Up Foundation launches Inspiring Voices, a new podcast exploring the role of singing in improving mental health and wellbeing This week, the first two episodes of the Sing Up Foundation’s new podcast, Inspiring Voices have been released. Inspiring Voices is a new podcast from the Sing Up Foundation dedicated to exploring the role of singing, songwriting, voice exploration and creative music-making in improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. The podcast is hosted by the Sing Up Foundation’s Joint Head of Foundation Baz Chapman and features inspiring conversations with singers, leaders, researchers and other music specialists. The first series will feature nine conversations that will be released fortnightly from September to December 2023 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music and Google Podcasts. Each episode of Inspiring Voices will also be available to view as videos on the Sing Up Foundation’s YouTube channel. This first series has been funded through support received by Sing Up and the Sing Up Foundation from Round 3 of Arts Council England’s Cultural Recovery Fund and the podcast will be of particular interest to teachers, school leaders, teaching students, community workers, music leaders, singing leaders, choir leaders, charity workers and mental health workers. The first episode of the Inspiring Voices podcast, released this week, features a conversation with wellbeing music specialist, educator, author and speaker Sophie Garner. In this episode, Sophie shares her advice with Baz on how to get started with singing with any group and through poignant stories from across her career, she demonstrates how she gets young people involved in songwriting. She also introduces her books on singing to support children & young people's mental health & wellbeing. The second episode, also released this week, will feature a conversation with vocalist, clarinettist, composer and workshop leader Aga Serugo-Lugo. In this inspirational conversation, Aga shares his experiences and views on the value of group singing, the power of performance and tips for leading singing successfully taken from his years of working with groups as wide ranging as Streetwise Opera to local community choirs to children’s groups and Music in Detention to name a few. The first season of Inspiring Voices will also feature conversations with community musician and Yorkshire Youth and Music’s lead practitioner Chris Morris, singing leader and director of Living Song Jane Wheeler, community musician and vice chair of Sound Sense Mark Bick, Chair of Music Education at University College London Professor Graham Welch, international non-binary beatbox star SK Shlomo, Creative Manager, Community Leader, Award-winning Educator Ben Turner and vocal animateur and Principal Conductor of Young Voices David Lawrence. A video trailer for the first season featuring all the guests can be found at https://bit.ly/IVPodTrailer Baz Chapman, Joint Head of Foundation and Inspiring Voices podcast host says: ‘At a time when children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing is of increasing concern, we want Inspiring Voices to shine a light on the outstanding work being done by all sorts of people to transform young lives through singing. The podcast guests have been an absolute privilege to speak with, and we hope they will inspire others to explore how singing and vocal creativity can achieve amazing things’. The first two episodes of Inspiring Voices can be heard now on the following platforms at: Spotify: https://bit.ly/IVPodSpotify Apple: https://apple.co/45ZCVTx Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3raZXrF Google: https://bit.ly/IVPodGoogle YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@SingUpFoundation IMAGES: CAPTION: Inspiring Voices podcast cover art. CAPTION: Inspiring Voices podcast guest, Sophie Garner, working with children as part of a songwriting workshop. CAPTION: In his element, Inspiring Voices guest Aga Serugo-Lugo conducting a performance at a festival. ENDS Notes to Editors Inspiring Voices is a new podcast created by the Sing Up Foundation, hosted by Baz Chapman Joint Head of Foundation. Through conversations with singers, leaders, researchers and other specialists, the podcast considers the unique role of singing, songwriting, voice exploration and creative music-making in improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. The first series will feature nine episodes that will be released fortnightly from September to December 2023. This series has been funded through support received by Sing Up and the Sing Up Foundation from Round 3 of Arts Council England’s Cultural Recovery Fund. The video trailer for the first season of Inspiring Voices can be viewed on the Sing Up Foundation’s YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/IVPodTrailer Inspiring Voices can be found on the following platforms: Spotify: https://bit.ly/IVPodSpotify Apple: https://apple.co/45ZCVTx Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3raZXrF Google: https://bit.ly/IVPodGoogle The Sing Up Foundation (www.singupfoundation.org) produces, promotes and creates opportunities for children and young people to improve their mental health and wellbeing through singing. Through partnerships, resource development and innovation the Sing Up Foundation – explores and highlight effective practice, connects practice with research, creates research-based pilot projects to build and share knowledge and understanding and increase impact, and supports and develops the workforce and settings surrounding children and young people. The Sing Up Foundation is Sing Up’s charitable arm focused on producing charitable activities through fundraising, partnerships and innovation. The Foundation shares in Sing Up’s goal to ensure that children and young people have opportunities to sing and make music regularly and well for all the benefits that research shows that brings, with a particular focus on mental health and wellbeing. Foundation staff work for Sing Up and sit on Sing Up’s Senior Management Team. Likewise, two members of Sing Up’s staff, including CEO Michelle James, sit on the Foundation’s Board of Trustees. Sing Up (www.singup.org) is an award-winning organisation that provides resources, training and guidance to support singing and music in schools. Sing Up believes that all children and young people have a right to good quality singing provision, to deepen their understanding of music and singing, raise attainment and develop lasting tools to express themselves with confidence and creativity. With over 15 years of experience at the forefront of music education, Sing Up’s specially arranged songs, teaching tools and support put singing and music at the heart of learning. The full first season of Inspiring Voices will feature conversations with: Sophie Garner - Sophie Garner is a singer described by the Times as 'one of the most stylish British vocalists', as well as being a music specialist, educator, speaker, and author of two books: The Creative Songwriting Journal and If You Can't Say It, Sing It! Sophie seeks to change lives through singing and songwriting. Aga Serugo-Lugo - Aga Serugo-Lugo is a vocalist, clarinettist, composer and workshop leader whose interests lie particularly in narrative-based community music-making, focussing on accessibility and inclusivity. He has worked with, amongst many others, Music in Detention, Trinity Laban, MENCAP, Wigmore Hall, Sing Up and numerous opera companies around the UK. He also co-runs Camberwell Community Choir and is Ambassador for Britten Pears Arts' 'Group A' in Lowestoft and Ipswich. Chris Morris - Chris Morris is a community musician working in and around Sheffield. He has helped to set up recording studios for community use, organises music events and Festivals and is a guide and mentor to many young musicians in the city. He is lead practitioner with Yorkshire Youth & Music working with young people in Youth Justice Settings and secure children’s homes, whom they describe as one of their exceptional music leaders, working as he does with some of the nation’s most vulnerable young people, so that they can discover, explore and develop their musical and creative potential. Jane Wheeler - Jane Wheeler is a freelance music education consultant and Director of Living Song, who works with a passion for raising the quality of music-making, developing young leaders and fostering community cohesion. Her many roles have included Music Advisor for the London Borough of Newham, Director of the music programme for ARK Schools, and Director of several choirs including Solid Harmony Youth Community Choir, Forest Voices adult community choir and New Young Voice Collective. Since 2014, Jane has been a leader for British Council’s World Voice programme. Mark Bick - Mark is a renowned and highly experienced community musician and trainer. Most of his working life based in Gloucestershire, particularly starting up what has now become The Music Works. He also worked in the West Midlands developing and leading training courses, including the Quench Arts New Horizons course, which has been running for nearly 20 years. The core of Mark’s work has been with young people who struggle with various barriers, including those excluded from school, who are looked after, or have disabilities. Mark is Vice Chair of Sound Sense, the UK professional association for community musicians. Professor Graham Welch - Professor Graham Welch is Chair of Music Education at University College London, Chair of the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research and is heavily involved in the International Society for Music Education. He is a former member of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council Review College for Music and has published numerous research papers into music and particularly singing, not least ‘Researching the Impact of the National Singing Programme ‘Sing Up' in England’ in 2011. SK Shlomo - SK Shlomo is an international non-binary beatbox star, former world looping champion, 3-times TEDx speaker and disability & mental health ambassador. They are also founder of the Beatbox Academy and long-time friend of Sing Up, being as they are, particularly gifted at, and committed to, working with children and young people. Ben Turner – Ben Turner is a Creative Manager, Community Leader, Award-winning Educator and Youth Arts Leader with experience in education, youth activism and creative arts/entertainment. Founding Director of Rap Club Productions C.I.C (home of The Spit Game, SpokenLDN, KingdomLDN), working against serious youth violence and promoting positive youth communities and cultures. He supports schools to embrace young Black cultures and creativity within the curriculum. He is a regular conference speaker and endorsed by the Home Office, TeachFirst, BBC and others for approach to youth work/education. David Lawrence - David Lawrence is one of the UK’s most versatile conductors, who works with symphony orchestras and bands, and with choirs and choruses of all types. But David may be best known as Principal Conductor of the Young Voices arena concerts with thousands of school children. For further information and photos, please contact Celi Barberia or Baz Chapman (info@singupfoundation.org), 0204 566 9666

  • Watch our podcast trailer for Inspiring Voices

    Over Autumn 2023 on the Sing Up Foundation podcast, Inspiring Voices, we'll be meeting fascinating singers, teachers, researchers and more, to explore singing for mental health & wellbeing for children & young people. Ahead of our first 2 episodes, featuring Sophie Garner and Aga Serugo-Lugo, we're delighted to share our trailer to give you a flavour of what's coming. You can subscribe now to get the episodes as they are released: Spotify: https://bit.ly/IVPodSpotify Apple: https://apple.co/45ZCVTx Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3raZXrF Google: https://bit.ly/IVPodGoogle The Sing Up Foundation believes in the power of singing to improve health and wellbeing – so listen in and be inspired! Supported using public funding by Arts Council England as part of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

  • Full Conference Schedule Out Now

    See the full schedule of our two-day online conference 'Singing for Mental Health and Wellbeing: Spotlight on Children and Young People'. Run in partnership with Music for Good and the Singing for Health Network, the conference will run on 26 May and 30 June 2023 and recordings will be made available for all ticket holders. Book your tickets now - there are one and two-day tickets available. https://bit.ly/SHNBookCYPTicket Full schedule - May 26th - Focus on inclusion and working with vulnerable groups 9:30-10:00 – Welcome and housekeeping - Intro to the Sing Up Foundation and the Singing for Health Network 10:00-10:30 – Tom Benjamin - An inclusive approach to music-making. Presentation on research exploring practical ways of adopting and modifying music scores through technology, to allow for more inclusive access 10:30-11:00 – Abigail Mann-Daraz - Developing a research and evidence-informed approach to working with autism, ensuring inclusive practice and participant voice are central to promote well-being 11:00-11:15- Break 11:15-12:00 – Emily Foulkes - Presentation of a trauma-informed singing programme and trauma-informed principles 12:00–13:00 – Panel discussion on inclusive practice - chaired by Dr Andrew McWilliams, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and Researcher, University College London, Kings College Hospital and Great Ormond Street Hospital and Sing Up Foundation Trustee 13:00-13:45 – LUNCH 13:45-14:30 – Dr Hala Jaber, Professor Helen Phelan and Dr Fran Garry from the University of Limerick will present their new report for the first time. This research explored the benefits of 'Singing on the mental health of young refugees and unaccompanied minors' and implemented a literature review and evaluation, with a focus on developing recommendations on how to set up and run sessions/projects 14:30-14:45 – Break 14:45-15:30 – Q&A and panel discussion on implications and principles for practice - working with refugees and migrant minors, chaired by Dr Andrew McWilliams 15:30-15:50 – Break out rooms/ networking / sharing discussion 15:50-16:00 - Closing June 30th - Implications for practice and examining the notion and measurement of well-being 9:30-9:45 – Welcome and housekeeping 9:45-10:30 – Katarzyna Grebosz-Haring and Leonhard Thun-Hohenstein - Psychobiological Responses to Choral Singing in Mentally Ill and Healthy Children and Adolescents: Results of Preliminary Studies in Salzburg 10:30-10:50 – Kat Lord Watson & Stephen Deazley - Singing for Wellbeing in Scottish Schools. Presentation of research analysing the impact of the Singing for Wellbeing programme on the wellbeing outcomes of primary school children 10:50-11:00 – BREAK 11:00-11:20 – Fiona Evison – Relational Composition for Post-Pandemic Well-being in a Canadian Children’s Choir – Presentation reporting on the findings of research introducing composing for enhanced well-being to choristers 11:20-12:20 – Panel discussion on 'What is well-being and how can we measure it?' 12:20-13:00- BREAK 13:00-13:30 – Kevin Stannard & Rebecca Thompson- Collective nouns: give us a clew! Findings from a multi-modal compositional project in Coventry designed for younger pupils across the KS1/KS2 divide 13:30-14:00 – Jane Gosine - The neurodiverse youth choir: a model for more inclusive choral communities to support wellbeing. Presentation on principles and elements of practice and pedagogy from a youth choir project in Canada 14:00-14:30 – Dr Sarah Glew - Finding My Voice and Forming Our Place: Understanding the Effects of a Participatory Singing, Music and Drama Project on Wellbeing for Autistic Young People 14:30-14:45 – BREAK 14:45-15:15 - Lisa Price - Developing student self-efficacy through singing and music in primary school by designing a practical tool for the classroom teacher. What is self-efficacy, how can we measure it and how can we ensure we support the development of it? 15:15-16:00 - Anupa Paul and Teresa Shaw - Introduction to Music Performance Anxiety and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy principles as a potential practical tool for singing teachers Programme for both days subject to change

  • Coming Soon: New research on singing with young refugees and unaccompanied minors

    Sign up to be the first to know when this brand new report is available. The research conducted by Dr Hala Jaber, Dr Fran Garry and Professor Helen Phelan from the University of Limerick's Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and commissioned by Sing Up Foundation will include a literature review and collection of case studies, interviews and recommendations for further development of work in this area. The research is supported by the British Council through Sing Up Foundation's work on developing the legacy of the World Voice programme. As part of this work, the research team, headed up by Dr Hala Jaber, have conducted a literature review and evaluation of the benefits of singing on the mental health of young refugees and unaccompanied minors; developed recommendations on how to set up and run sessions and projects in future; and built a repository of research and evaluations in this field for the benefit of organisations looking to develop their practice in this area. Dr Hala Jaber and colleagues will be presenting their research for the first time on 26 May 2023 at an online conference run by Sing Up Foundation in partnership with Singing for Health Network and Music for Good. Please follow the button below to submit your details. Related News: PRESS RELEASE: Sing Up Foundation appoints a team of researchers from University of Limerick PRESS RELEASE: Sing Up Foundation continues legacy of the British Council’s World Voice programme

  • PRESS RELEASE: Sing Up Foundation appoints a team of researchers from University of Limerick

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 5 December 2022 Sing Up Foundation appoints a team of researchers from the University of Limerick's Irish World Academy of Music and Dance to conduct a research review on singing with young refugees Sing Up Foundation has appointed Dr Hala Jaber, Dr Fran Garry and Professor Helen Phelan from the University of Limerick’s Irish World Academy of Music and Dance to conduct research on the impact that singing has on the mental health and wellbeing of young refugee children and unaccompanied minors. Inspired by the British Council’s World Voice projects in Greece and Palestine working with young refugees, this research is supported by the British Council funding received by the Foundation to continue the legacy of World Voice. As part of this work, the research team, headed up by Dr Hala Jaber, will conduct a literature review and evaluation of the benefits of singing on the mental health of young refugees and unaccompanied minors; develop recommendations on how to set up and run sessions and projects in future; and build a repository of research and evaluations in this field for the benefit of organisations looking to develop their practice in this area. The research considers that political and other types of refugees form a group with added vulnerability to developing mental illness, thought to be due to a complex interaction of social, biological and psychological factors, playing out over the lifespan and across communities. Anecdotal reports from teachers working every day with young refugees in their classrooms and from music organisations and World Voice projects overseas, suggests that prioritising singing can help. However, the evidence base for arts interventions in the refugee community is still in development and there is need for a comprehensive, clear collection of effective and evidence-based practice to support the development of this work. With this research project, the Foundation hopes to help inform work in this area and improve outcomes for these young people. Researchers Dr Hala Jaber, Dr Fran Garry and Professor Helen Phelan said, “We are very happy to be working with the Sing Up Foundation on this important research project. As a group of music facilitators and researchers, we recognise the power of music to engage people, and enable the sharing of lived experience. Much of our work focuses on the role of music in supporting the inclusion, health and wellbeing of refugees, particularly in post-conflict contexts. We believe that the best learning comes from combining practice with research and are looking forward to uncovering and sharing, through this project, the knowledge and experiences of excellent music practices when working with refugees and unaccompanied minors.” Celi Barberia, Head of Sing Up Foundation said, “We have been so inspired by the work we have seen with young refugees and wanted to support the sector with this research to help inform practice and promote the impact that it can have on the lives of these very vulnerable young people. We are passionate about the benefits of singing on health and wellbeing and hope that through this research review we can help support those working with young refugees and unaccompanied minors to use the most effective evidence-based singing strategies to help improve outcomes. We are excited to be working with Dr Jaber, Dr Garry and Prof Phelan who are experts in the field and excellent advocates for the work.” ENDS Notes to editors Sing Up Foundation (www.singupfoundation.org) is the charitable arm of Sing Up. Sing Up has always been a champion of the wider benefits of singing – for education, social and health outcomes – and marked its 10th birthday in 2017 by launching the Sing Up Foundation, a charity with a commitment to a new charitable purpose supporting singing for health and wellbeing. Sing Up Foundation received a grant from the British Council in 2020 to continue the legacy of the British Council’s World Voice Programme. The World Voice programme worked in 23 countries across seven years training teachers overseas to use singing to develop musicality and as a tool for learning in the classroom. As part of this legacy, Sing Up Foundation has been consulting with partners overseas and working to create a new platform to continue this work which will feature this research. For more information on World Voice, visit: https://www.singupfoundation.org/worldvoice Sing Up (www.singup.org) is an award-winning organisation that provides resources, training and guidance to support singing and music in schools. Sing Up believes that all children and young people have a right to good quality singing provision, to deepen their understanding of music and singing, raise attainment and develop lasting tools to express themselves with confidence and creativity. With over 15 years of experience at the forefront of music education, Sing Up’s specially arranged songs, teaching tools and support put singing and music at the heart of learning. Dr Hala Jaber is an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Limerick, Ireland with a decade of facilitation experience with young people in the Middle East and Ireland as a music educator and community music facilitator. Her PhD in Arts Practice engaged critically with the music-making experiences of Syrian migrants escaping the war in their homeland. Her Postdoctoral degree investigates the co-designing, delivering, and evaluation of a training program that is trauma-informed for arts facilitators working in the context of post-conflict migration. Dr Fran Garry currently works as a postdoctoral researcher with the Health Research Institute, PART-IM (Participatory and Arts-Based Methods for Involving Migrants in Health Research) cluster at the University of Limerick. She is a singer, songwriter, community music educator, and an arts-based and arts practice researcher. Her work in educational and community settings includes choral leadership, vocal tuition, facilitation of musical composition, and arts project management. Prof Helen Phelan is a Professor of Arts Practice and Director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. She is the programme director of the PhD in Arts Practice and an Irish Research Council recipient for her work on music and migration. She is the founder of the Singing and Social Inclusion research group and Chair of IMBAS, a support network for artistic research in Ireland. She is PI of the PART-IM research cluster on arts-based methods in migrant health research, bringing together NGO partners with researchers in medicine, nursing & midwifery and the performing arts. For further information, please contact Celi Barberia, celi.barberia@singup.org

  • New Online Conference: Singing For Mental Health & Wellbeing –Spotlight on Children & Young People

    On 26 May and 30 June 2023, Sing Up Foundation, Singing for Health Network and Music for Good are partnering to deliver an online conference to spotlight research and practice in Singing for Mental Health and Wellbeing with a focus on Children and Young People. The conference will be split up into two days to cover this vast and growing area of work. The first day will focus on innovative practice and approaches by practitioners and organisations and the second will focus on sharing research from projects led by practitioner-researchers, early career researchers and established researchers. Practitioners, researchers and organisations can now submit proposals to present at the conference and get involved. More information is available on the Singing for Health website: https://www.singingforhealthnetwork.co.uk/call-for-papers The deadline for all submissions is Thursday, 6 April 2023. Bookings are now open to those who would like to attend the two-day online conference on 26 May 2023 and 30 June 2023. Book now via the Singing for Health Network website: https://www.singingforhealthnetwork.co.uk/event-details/singing-for-mental-health-and-wellbeing-spotlight-on-children-and-young-people-2023-05-26-09-00

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